Journalism

Passion? Or Prospects?

Image courtesy of digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By Jennifer Igiri

According to statistics publishing today, almost 50% of graduates are working in “non-graduate jobs”.

The Office for National Statistics, reported that “in 2013 those graduates that had an undergraduate degree in medicine or dentistry were the most likely to be employed and had the highest average gross annual pay.” Clearly, some professions are more ‘financially stable’ than others. But is this appealing enough to spend minimum 3 years studying something you don’t enjoy?

We asked a few students whether their educational choices were passion or employment driven, receiving the following response:

“I am extremely passionate about [my studies] and so far my employment prospects haven’t affected[this]” – Ayo Adelagun, Fashion Photography, University of the Arts, London.

“My aspirations as a child were always to work with animals, and through this degree I feel that I am finally on the right track. Although I know that the kind of jobs I can get out of this degree aren’t very well paid, I would rather be happy doing something I love than doing something I disliked for the sake of money.” – Christina Bolsher, 2nd year, BSc Animal Conservation and Biodiversity, University of Greenwich.

“I wouldn’t say I was passionate about law, but I do find […] it interesting. […] I don’t 100% know what I want to do with my life at the moment though.” – Yasmeen Joshi, Law, Canterbury Christ Church University.

In London there are hundreds of universities with thousands of courses on offer, covering all possible fields. With many options, and the rise of self-employment, it needn’t be ‘passion or career’. The job market is evolving with the 21st Century. New jobs are continuously being invented, and many students are choosing to follow their passions regardless of the outcome.

Ultimatelyit’s better to pursue what you enjoy. Employment prospects should not be the determining factor when deciding what to study.

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